Home » Health » Pennsylvania residents are urged to protect themselves from tick-borne disease as infection rates continue to rise in the state

Pennsylvania residents are urged to protect themselves from tick-borne disease as infection rates continue to rise in the state

As the weather warms and more Pennsylvanians venture outside, state officials are encouraging them to protect themselves from dangerous tick-borne diseases, these include Lyme disease and the rare and dangerous deer tick virus, which is found in ticks at high levels. For the first time in multiple locations across the state. “Lyme disease has been present in 67 counties for some time, and unfortunately, the spread of the highly dangerous deer tick virus appears to be increasing in some flea populations,” said Secretary of Environmental Protection Patrick McDonnell. Recommended precautions for anyone going outdoors: Apply insect repellent containing permethrin to clothing and an EPA-registered insect repellent, such as DEET, on exposed skin before going outdoors. Reapply as needed according to product instructions. Wear light colored outerwear. Put on a shirt in pants and a pair of socks, and walk down the aisle. Avoid wooded areas with low-growing plants and tall grass that may harbor fleas. When you return home, remove all clothing, shower, and place the clothes in the dryer on high heat to kill any attached fleas. Check teeth for lice Perform a full body lice check with a hand mirror or a full-size mirror, including hidden areas such as the scalp, ears, armpits, belly button, and between the legs. Check pets that are exposed to potential flea habitat each time they come back inside, if you find fleas stuck to your skin, use tweezers to carefully remove them, including the head. Watch for symptoms and call your doctor if you have any questions. For more information about preventing tick-borne disease, visit the Department of Health’s Tickborne Disease website. The DTV Tick Monitoring and Testing Program in Pennsylvania detected an unusually high rate of DTV infection in adult tick samples. Recently caught from three locations: Fisherman’s Paradise Public Fishing Area in Spring Creek in Center County, Iroquois Trail near Tunkhanock in Wyoming County, and Lawrence Township Recreation Park in Clearfield County, at each of these locations, infestation rates exceeded 80% tick samples, officials said. DTV has been detected in 15 states of Pennsylvania, and the statewide infection rate outside the three current hotspots is 0.6% of the tick sample. , we can avoid cases of Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases,” said GP Dr. Dennis Johnson N. “The Department of Health estimates that there is at least one case of Lyme disease for every 100 people in Pennsylvania each year. Lyme disease can cause flu-like symptoms and a rash in its early stages, but the infection can spread to the joints and heart. And the nervous system if left untreated. If you experience symptoms, I encourage you to see your healthcare provider immediately. The black-legged tick, also called the deer tick, is active even in winter when temperatures are in the mid-30s and up, officials said. From ticks found in recreational areas with high DTV-positive rates. Transmission of DTV, officials say. Deer tick virus, a type of Powassan virus, is rare in the United States, but positive cases have been increasing in recent years. It is transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected tick and is not passed from person to person. The virus is transmitted from person to person. powassan can be passed from ticks to humans in Less than 15 minutes after the bite occurs Other tick-borne diseases, such as Lyme disease, take longer to cause infection — often 24 hours or more after the tick has contacted its host There is no vaccine to prevent or cure treat the Poisan virus. This is the best way to reduce the risk of infection and disease. Early symptoms of DTV infection may include fever, headache, vomiting, and weakness. Some people with DTV are asymptomatic, so infection may go undetected. However, 91% of patients treated with DTV n DTV infection progresses to severe neurologic disease. Those who exhibit severe illness from the deer tick virus may develop encephalitis or meningitis and require hospitalization, with symptoms including confusion, loss of coordination, difficulty speaking, or seizures, and about 12% of people who are seriously ill have died. Nearly half of those who survive severe illness experience long-term health effects. For more information on the health effects of DTV, visit the Powassan Virus Disease Control and Prevention website.

As the weather gets warmer and more Pennsylvanians get out, state officials are encouraging them to protect themselves from the dangerous tick-borne disease.

These include Lyme disease and the rare and dangerous deer tick virus, which has been found in ticks at high levels for the first time in multiple locations across the state.

“Lyme disease has been present in 67 counties for some time, and unfortunately, the spread of this highly dangerous deer tick virus appears to be increasing in some flea populations,” said Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell.

precautionary measures

Recommended precautions for anyone going overseas include:

  • Apply insect repellent containing permethrin to clothing and an EPA-registered insect repellent on exposed skin before going outdoors. Reapply as needed according to product instructions.
  • Wear light colored outerwear. Slide the shirt into the pants and the pants into the socks.
  • Walk in the middle of the trail. Avoid wooded areas and shrubs with low -growing plants and tall grasses that may be breeding grounds for fleas.
  • After returning home, remove all clothes, shower, and place the clothes in the dryer over high heat to kill any attached fleas. Check the teeth for lice.
  • Perform a full body examination with a hand mirror or full size mirror, including hidden areas such as the scalp, ears, armpits, belly button, and between the legs.
  • Check to see if any pets have been exposed to potential flea habitat each time you return indoors.
  • If you find a tick attached to your skin, use tweezers to carefully remove it, including the head. Watch for symptoms and call your doctor if you have any questions.

For more information on preventing tick-borne diseases, visit the Ministry of Health Tickborne Disease website.

DTV of Pennsylvania

The DEP Tick Testing and Control Program detected unusually high levels of DTV in adult tick samples taken recently from three locations:

  • Fisherman’s Paradise Public Fishing Area in Spring Creek in Center County.
  • The Iroquois Line near Tunkhanock, Wyoming.
  • Lawrence Township Amusement Park in Clearfield County.

Officials said the infection rate at each of those sites exceeded 80% of the tick samples.

DTV has been detected in 15 states of Pennsylvania, and the statewide infection rate outside the three current hotspots is 0.6% of the tick sample.

“By knowing where lice are, seeking treatment if they develop symptoms, and following best practices for prevention, we can avoid cases of Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases,” said GP Dr. Dennis Johnson. “The Department of Health estimates that there is at least one case of Lyme disease for every 100 people in Pennsylvania each year. Lyme disease can cause flu-like symptoms and a rash in its early stages, but the infection can spread to the joints, heart, and nervous system if left untreated. If you develop symptoms, I urge you to see your healthcare provider immediately.”

Officials say the black-legged tick, also called the deer tick, is active even in winter when temperatures are in the mid-30s and up.

The Department of Environmental Protection has put up signs warning the public and will take additional control measures and testing to reduce and control the number of ticks found in recreational areas with high positive rates for DTV.

DTV transmission, symptoms

The deer tick virus, a type of Poisin virus, is rare in the United States, but positive cases have increased in recent years, officials said. It is transmitted to people through the bite of an infected tick and is not passed from person to person.

The Poisan virus can be passed from ticks to humans within 15 minutes of the bite. Other tick-borne diseases, such as Lyme disease, take longer to cause infection—often 24 hours or more after the tick has attached itself to its host.

There is no vaccine to prevent or medication to treat the Poisan virus. Preventing tick bites is the best way to reduce the risk of infection and disease.

Early symptoms of DTV infection may include fever, headache, vomiting, and weakness. Some people with DTV have no symptoms, so the infection may go undetected. However, 91% of patients treated for DTV infection developed severe neurologic disease.

Those who develop severe illness from the deer tick virus may develop encephalitis or meningitis and require hospitalization, with symptoms including confusion, loss of coordination, difficulty speaking or seizures.

About 12% of those with acute illness died. Nearly half of people with acute illness experience long-term health effects.

For more information on the health effects of DTV, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Powassan virus website.

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