Study reveals that 80% of Argentines would leave the country if they could

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The coronavirus has hit everyone very hard. Apart from the most dramatic impact, such as the loss of human lives, there are also other elements such as psychological wear and tear due to extensive confinements, job uncertainty, economic problems and a general uncertainty of what the near future holds for us.

This scenario was the one that deepened in Argentina the study by the consulting firm Taquión Research Strategy, together with the companies Inclusion and Gestión Aplicada, and the results were surprising, since they warn of a dramatic scenario of pessimism and attrition in the transandinos, a figure that for Certainly they could be projected throughout Latin America.

The analysis, published in Infobae, reveals that “50.8% of Argentines are already thinking about the day after quarantine. The themes of the concerns vary in relation to the reality they expect to find. Health is no longer a priority, access to development opportunities and access to work, are the most important elements to consider. “

Another outstanding aspect is that the vast majority of trans-Andean people would leave the country if they could, which speaks of an evil of almost the entire continent: the total lack of confidence in the authorities and institutions to solve real problems. “Eight out of every ten Argentines who have the possibility of projecting their problems over 10 years, would leave the country if they had the conditions to do so,” says the report.

The filmmakers of the study end with the following paragraph: “We are facing a pandemic that will not cease. The desire, energy, and hope for prompt improvement become more difficult to sustain. Thinking and projecting for the long term today has another meaning. However, we Argentines have experience and in difficult moments we bring out our best feature: resilience. “

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