Revealed, COVID-19 Triggered Patient’s Immune System Attacking His Body …

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JAKARTA – Worldwide,immunologist join in the fight against SARS-CoV-2. They went to great lengths to explain why some people became so sick, while others recovered unscathed. (Also read: Six Institutions Develop Red and White Vaccines)

One immunologist, Matthew Woodruff, also wrote his opinion on the page Live Science related to this phenomenon. The author has a field that focuses on the production of antibodies – powerful proteins that are able to immobilize and kill invading pathogens, such as viruses.

Of great concern is the sporadic identification of so-called autoreactive antibodies, instead of targeting diseases that cause microbes, these antibodies target the tissues of individuals suffering from COVID-19.

Early studies involved these autoantibodies in the formation of dangerous blood clots in intensively treated patients. Recently, they have been linked to severe disease by deactivating an important component of the viral immune defense in a minority of patients with severe disease.

As an immunologist at the Lowance Center for Human Immunology at Emory University, Matthew has been investigating the immune response that is responsible for producing antibodies in COVID-19. Under the direction of Dr. Ignacio Sanz, and his team, he has been investigating the immune response that contributes to the production of autoantibodies in autoimmune disorders such as lupus, and more recently in severe cases of COVID-19.

“Although we could classify the response in COVID-19 patients as autoimmune, we could not confirm the production of autoantibodies hidden in their antiviral response,” said Matthew. (Also read: The Task Force Reveals a Number of Preparations for the Implementation of Corona Vaccinations)

Now Identified
In a newly released study, Matthew describes the worrying finding that in the sickest patients with COVID-19, autoantibody production is common – a finding with the potential to have a large impact on acute patient care and infection recovery.

Autoantibodies have a “taste” that is usually associated with certain types of disease. Lupus patients, for example, often have antibodies that target their own DNA – the molecules that make up the human genome.

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