NYPD Commissioner Shea and First Deputy Commissioner Tucker to Retire at Year-End – Telemundo New York (47)

What you should know

  • New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea and the department’s second-in-command, First Deputy Commissioner Benjamin Tucker, will finish their full terms and retire at the end of the year, according to an NYPD spokesperson.
  • Shea took over as chief of the New York City Police in 2019 as the successor to Commissioner James O’Neill, and led the largest and one of the oldest police force in the United States.
  • Meanwhile, Tucker began his career with the New York City Police Department in 1969 as a police apprentice before rising through the ranks and eventually working for the administrations of former President Bill Clinton and Barack Obama.

New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea and the department’s second-in-command, First Deputy Commissioner Benjamin Tucker, will finish their full terms and retire at the end of the year, according to an NYPD spokesperson.

Police Commissioner Shea and First Deputy Commissioner Tucker will have much more to say in the coming weeks as they discuss their public service and gratitude to the city and the men and women of the department,” according to the department spokesman.

Administratively, the Police Commissioner must notify you 30 days in advance.

Shea took over as chief of the New York City Police in 2019 as the successor to Commissioner James O’Neill, and led the largest and one of the oldest police force in the United States.

Born and raised in Sunnyside, Dermot Shea is a New Yorker through and through. A 28-year veteran, he knows what it’s like to walk a bit and lead a district. He helped build the strategies that have brought crime to record lows. a proven agent of change, “Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted the day he announced that he had chosen Shea as O’Neill’s replacement.

“As commissioner, Chief Shea will focus on putting 21st century precision policing to work to deepen police-community ties and end the scourge of gun and gang violence.”

Prior to his role as commissioner, Shea, a 28-year veteran of the New York City Police, was promoted to Chief of Detectives on April 16, 2018. In this role, he was tasked with overseeing a command unified for all investigative operations in New York City. The Bureau of Detectives is responsible for crime prevention, detection and investigation, and its work often complements the work of police officers assigned to precincts.

Before serving as Chief of Detectives, Shea served as Chief of Crime Control Strategies. He also spent more than 4 years as Deputy Commissioner for Operations.

While serving as Chief of Crime Control Strategies, he was responsible for analyzing crime trends throughout the city and developing the department’s crime control plans and procedures.

During his 28-year career, Shea also served as the Executive Officer of Barracks 47 and Detective Borough Manhattan South. He also worked in Barracks 24, 46 and 52 and in the Narcotics Division.

Shea took office at a time when there was a spike in potential hate crimes, the rise in homelessness, and officer morale was low. (Before his retirement, O’Neill was criticized by the president of the Police Benevolent Association, Pat Lynch, for firing Daniel Pantaleo, the New York City Police Officer charged with using a prohibited strangulation that led to the death of Eric Garner in 2014). Shea faced the rise in gun violence in the city and other forms of crime during the height of the pandemic, including on the subway.

Meanwhile, Tucker began his career with the New York City Police Department in 1969 as a police apprentice and received specialized training from physicians and substance abuse experts to participate in the first ever drug prevention educational program sponsored by the New York Police Department.

Finally, Tucker became a police officer in 1972 and was promoted to sergeant in 1987.

Tucker had several roles during his decades-long career with the NYPD, according to his city bio, including police academy instructor, legal counsel in the Office of the Deputy Commissioner for Legal Affairs, and Deputy Chairman of the Civil Complaints Review Board. .

Tucker also served as Deputy Assistant Director for Law Enforcement Services in the Mayor’s Office of Operations, and First Deputy Commissioner and Executive Director of the Commission on Human Rights under Mayor Edward I. Koch. He was also chief operating officer in the Manhattan Borough President’s office. During the Bloomberg administration, Tucker also served as Executive Director of School Safety and Planning for the Department of Education.

In 1995, then-President Bill Clinton appointed Tucker as Assistant Director of Operations in the Office of Community Oriented Police Services of the United States Department of Justice. Then, in 2009, Tucker was nominated by then-President Barack H. Obama, and confirmed by the United States Senate, as Deputy Director of State, Local, and Tribal Affairs within the Office of National Drug Control Policy. of the White House.

Additionally, Tucker also led research projects at New York University’s Substance Abuse Strategy Initiative and Columbia University’s Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

With Shea and Tucker resigning in the future, Mayor-elect Eric Adams, himself a retired New York City Police Captain, will be tasked with finding replacements.

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