Covid 19 England: – Worse than “worst case scenario”

The government’s scientific advisers (Sage) say that four times more people are infected with coronary heart disease than expected, writes BBC Friday.

The health authorities operate with an “acceptable worst case scenario” to plan the efforts in the coming months. That meant 85,000 covid-19 deaths during the winter.

A Sage document dated October 14 reveals that the situation is worse than expected.

The original scenario estimated 12-13,000 daily infections in England in October. The latest estimate is that between 43,000 and 74,000 people were infected daily in England until mid-October.

More with infection

Statistics Norway Ons states that in the week from 17 to 23 October, cases of infection continued to increase sharply in the United Kingdom, with an average of 51,900 cases per day. This is an increase of 50 percent from the week before.

560,000 Britons had the virus in their bodies last week, compared to 433,000 the week before.

Teenagers and young adults

The figures also show that the infection rates in the last two weeks have increased in all age groups, reports Sky News. The infection is highest among older teenagers and young adults, as well as in the north of England, where the most stringent measures have now been introduced.

As of Monday, these measures will be introduced for a further 2.4 million people in West Yorskhire, including the city of Leeds. Thus, around 11 million inhabitants in England will be subject to the strictest restrictions.

Discourages travel

This means, among other things, a ban on socializing indoors with other households. Pubs and bars that do not serve proper meals are closed and unnecessary travel is discouraged.

In the last 24 hours, 24,400 new corona cases and 274 deaths have been registered in the UK. In total, almost 990,000 have tested positive, and over 46,000 have died.

In the last two weeks, 438 infected per 100,000 inhabitants have been registered in the country.

(NTB)

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