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France 24

London plans to ban importation of products linked to forced Uyghur labor

Denouncing Beijing’s “barbarism” towards Uyghurs, the UK on Tuesday unveiled measures to prevent goods linked to the forced labor of this Muslim minority in the Xinjiang region from reaching UK consumers. Relations are strained. a little more between London and Beijing on the question of the Uyghur minority. The United Kingdom will tighten its trade system in order to avoid the importation of products from Xinjiang, British Foreign Minister Dominic Raab announced on Tuesday (January 12th). During a speech in Parliament, the head of the British diplomacy said there was far-reaching and “heartbreaking” evidence of the use of forced labor targeting the Uyghur Muslim minority in Xinjiang. It is “hopefully relegated barbarism to the past that is practiced today. “, declared Dominic Raab before the British deputies, evoking” the arbitrary detention, the political re-education, the forced labor, the torture and the forced sterilization “of the Uyghurs” on an industrial scale “. >> See also on France24. com: In China, Uyghurs victims of an imposed birth control policy The United Nations estimates that at least 1 million of them, as well as members of other minorities, were detained in internment camps. of lies and claims that they are vocational training centers intended to keep people away from the temptation of Islamism, terrorism and separatism after a series of attacks attributed to Uyghurs Fines for more transparency Dominic Raab cited in support of the reports of the existence of internment camps as well as the practices of forced labor and sterilization of Uyghur women. “We must do more and we will do it,” he said. declared. “Xinjiang’s position in the international supply chain network means that there is a real risk that companies and public bodies around the world, inadvertently or not, are sourcing from suppliers complicit in the use of labor. forced “. >> To see and read on France 24: Uyghurs, to the force of the camps” This set of measures will ensure that no British organization, whether public or private, benefits or contributes , willfully or inadvertently, to human rights abuses targeting Uyghurs or other minorities in Xinjiang, “he said. Directives will be issued to British companies, which will face fines if they cannot demonstrate that their supplies are not linked to forced labor in Xinjiang, a huge region in northwest China which is a major supplier of cotton to the world. This transparency obligation will be extended to the public sector, underlined Dominic Raab, and companies profiting from forced labor will be excluded from public procurement. Exports will also be controlled to prevent companies from contributing “directly or indirectly” to human rights violations in this region bordering Afghanistan and Pakistan, he continued. “A purely political attack”, according to the Chinese ambassador to the UN After an intervention Tuesday at the UN by the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, James Cleverly, criticizing the violation of human rights in Xinjiang, the Chinese ambassador to UN, Zhang Jun called on the UK “to stop interfering in the internal affairs of China.” The representative of the United Kingdom departed from the topic of today’s debate and spoke launched baseless attacks on China which we firmly reject and refute, “insisted Zhang Jun.” As a victim of terrorism, China has taken decisive steps to firmly combat terrorism and extremism [et] our actions are reasonable, based on our laws, and in accordance with established practice by countries around the world, “he added. The UK government’s announcement of these measures comes shortly after the end of December’s conclusion of an agreement in principle criticized by human rights defenders on investments between China and the European Union, of which the United Kingdom is no longer a part.With AFP and Reuters

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