Air Quality Warning Issued for Long Island and NYC – NBC New York

What you should know

  • In the midst of an intense hot day, authorities have issued a warning for poor air quality in New York and Long Island.
  • It will be in effect from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday due to high ozone levels.
  • DEC and DOH issue air quality health advisories when their experts forecast that pollution levels, whether ozone or fine particulate matter, exceed an Air Quality Index (AQI) value of 100.

NEW YORK – As the tri-state region grapples with an intense heat spell, New York officials have issued an air quality advisory for New York City and Long Island.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos, along with State Department of Health (DOH) Commissioner Dr. Mary T. Bassett, issued the warning on Thursday afternoon.

It will be in effect from 11 am to 11 pm on Friday due to high ozone levels.

DEC and DOH issue air quality health advisories when their experts forecast that pollution levels, whether ozone or fine particulate matter, exceed an Air Quality Index (AQI) value of 100. The AQI was created as an easy way to correlate levels of different contaminants on a scale, with a higher AQI value indicating a greater health concern. You can treat it by putting your postal code here.

ABOUT OZONE IN THE SUMMER

Summer heat can lead to the formation of ground-level ozone, a major component of photochemical smog. Automobile exhaust and out-of-state emission sources are the main sources of ground-level ozone and are the most serious air pollution problems in the Northeast, according to the DEC.

This surface pollutant should not be confused with the protective layer of ozone in the upper atmosphere.

WHO IS AFFECTED BY POOR AIR QUALITY?

People, especially young children, those who exercise outdoors, those who do strenuous work outdoors, and those with respiratory illnesses (such as asthma) should consider limiting strenuous outdoor physical activity when ozone levels are high. higher (usually in the evening or at night).

When outdoor ozone levels are high, going indoors generally reduces your exposure. People experiencing symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, or cough should consider seeing their doctor.
Ozone levels generally decrease at night and can be minimized during the day by reducing car travel and using public transportation when available.

STEPS TO REDUCE POLLUTION

New Yorkers are urged to take the following steps to save energy and reduce pollution:

  • Use public transportation or carpooling instead of driving, as car emissions account for about 60 percent of the pollution in our cities;
  • Conserve fuel and reduce exhaust gas emissions by combining the necessary trips in motorized vehicles;
  • Turn off all lights and electrical appliances in unoccupied areas;
  • Use fans to circulate air. If air conditioning is necessary, set thermostats at 78 degrees;
  • Close blinds and curtains to limit heat build-up and preserve fresh air;
  • Limit the use of electrical appliances. If necessary, run appliances during off-peak hours (after 7:00 pm). These would include dishwashers, dryers, pool pumps, and water heaters;
  • Set refrigerators and freezers to more efficient temperatures;
  • Purchase and install energy-efficient lighting and appliances with the Energy Star label; Y
  • Reduce or eliminate outdoor burning and try to minimize indoor sources of tiny particles, such as smoking. DEC has established a toll-free Air Quality Hotline (1-800-535-1345) to keep New Yorkers informed of the latest air quality situation.
  • Additional information on ozone and PM 2.5 (tiny particles or droplets in the air that are two and a half microns or less in width) is available at DEC website and on the site DOH web.

SECTORS IMPACTED BY THE AIR QUALITY ADVISORY

The regions impacted by the health and air quality advisory on Friday, July 22 are as follows:

  • Long Island, which includes Nassau and Suffolk counties
  • New York City Metro Region, which includes New York City, Rockland, and Westchester counties.

The tri-state area is under an intense heat spell with temperatures expected to exceed 100 degrees.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Recent News