Malicious software "hides" inside your phone and works in silence


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Google Play recently pulled out two applications containing malicious software for banks and banks, the Mirror newspaper reported.

According to the information, an application contaminated with malicious software is related to the provision of battery power, while the second relates to currency conversion.

Trend Micro, an anti-virus company, said the applications were using a malicious program that looked like an encrypted piece of software called Anubis.

This malicious program can avoid Google's anti-virus test, because it hides in applications that appear to be free from malware.

Of course, after downloading the application, it will communicate with the control and control server, and then load the silently and in the background, the user's trick to run the malicious program later on.

The application uses the sensor data of the phone to monitor the movement, and if nothing is noticed it will not work.

But when you notice movement, the application asks the user to install the new update, which is actually a malicious software package.

After pressing the Accept and Play button, the application starts, allowing the transfer of each printed character on the cell phone to the party that designed the malicious program.

Trend Micro believes that using the bank's application will put personal information at risk, and if it works for a relatively long period of time, it will be able to gather enough information to allow it to run to your bank and other accounts.

According to Trend Micro, the Battery Saver Moby Battery Saver application was downloaded about 5,000 times before being pulled out of Google Play and received 4.5 stars in the rating and 73 reviews were written.

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Google Play recently pulled out two applications containing malicious software for banks and banks, the Mirror newspaper reported.

According to the information, an application contaminated with malicious software is related to the provision of battery power, while the second relates to currency conversion.

Trend Micro, an anti-virus company, said the applications were using a malicious program that looked like an encrypted piece of software called Anubis.

This malicious program can avoid Google's anti-virus test, because it hides in applications that appear to be free from malware.

Of course, after downloading the application, it will communicate with the control and control server, and then load the silently and in the background, the user's trick to run the malicious program later on.

The application uses the sensor data of the phone to monitor the movement, and if nothing is noticed it will not work.

But when you notice movement, the application asks the user to install the new update, which is actually a malicious software package.

After pressing the Accept and Play button, the application starts, allowing the transfer of each printed character on the cell phone to the party that designed the malicious program.

Trend Micro believes that using the bank's application will put personal information at risk, and if it works for a relatively long period of time, it will be able to gather enough information to allow it to run to your bank and other accounts.

According to Trend Micro, the Battery Saver Moby Battery Saver application was downloaded about 5,000 times before being pulled out of Google Play and received 4.5 stars in the rating and 73 reviews were written.

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