Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Carlos Ghosn says he is "falsely accused" at his first appearance before a judge in Japan


The boss of Renault is accused of having reduced his remuneration as chairman of the board of directors of Nissan. He is also indicted for breach of trust.

He appeared on Tuesday, January 8, for the first time before a judge, at his request, nearly two months after his surprise arrest in Tokyo, Japan. Renault CEO Carlos Ghosn told himself "falsely accused and unfairly detained". Wearing a dark suit, no tie, green plastic sandals at the foot, he appeared clearly emaciated, hollow cheeks, handcuffed, with a rope around his waist before the start of the session that lasted almost two hours, 10:30 to 12:15 (local time)

Speaking in English, Carlos Ghosn recalled that he had dedicated "Two decades of his life to rise to Nissan", a company he says he loves. He claimed "to have acted with honor, legally and with the knowledge and approval of the leaders of the company", according to a written statement he read.

The boss of Renault assured that he did not have any cover for personal losses to Nissan and detailed the transactions for which he is accused of breach of trust, ensuring that the sums paid by a subsidiary of Nissan to a Saudi businessman were paid for services rendered to assist the group in the Gulf region.

The judge justified his continued detention by a risk of flight abroad "where he has bases" and alteration of evidence. "There is sufficient evidence to suggest that the suspect could induce data subjects to conceal offenses", argued the magistrate.

Carlos Ghosn was indicted on December 10 for concealment of part of his income: about 5 billion yen (38 million euros) over five years, from 2010 to 2015. After his first guard at the businessman was the subject of a new arrest warrant for a similar reduction of emoluments, but this time between 2015 and 2018, then a third, for breach of trust.

After disappointed hopes of release in December, the car magnate arrives Friday at the end of his third custody, but he can remain in prison pending his trial or even be arrested on new charges.


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